Hangama Amiri in Elle Canada

8 Canadian Artists to Check Out This Fall Canada has a rich creative history and boasts some of the most exciting artists in the world today. by Robb Jamieson An Afghan-Canadian artist who works mainly in mixed-media textiles, Hangama Amiri layers fabric, carefully sews all the details and uses acrylic paint and inkjet printed chiffon to create pictorial scenes. Amiri’s attraction to these materials is thanks to members of her …
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Geoff McFetridge in Artfacts

Geoff McFetridge: the Organic Interface Geoff McFetridge’s new body of work in The Organic Interface explores a concept that has been a constant source of inspiration and contemplation for the artist: How can images explain and communicate thoughts that are in between our understandings. On their way to some destination, traveling, transforming, evolving, becoming. […] To view the full text visit Artfacts. For more information about Geoff McFetridge please contact …
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Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill in The New York Times

On the Hudson, Visions for a New Native American Art By Holland Cotter Big stand-alone sculptures are inherently dramatic. “Deer Woman’s New Certificate-of-Indian-Blood-Skin” by Natalie Ball, which suggests a kind of quilted explosion, certainly has presence. So, in a spooky way, does Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill’s “Counterblaste,” a life-size nude female figure, part human, part animal, made from pantyhose stuffed with tobacco, street debris and wildflowers. Larger than either are fiber …
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Hangama Amiri in Third Text

Hangama Amiri’s ‘A Homage to Home’ at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, and in the Sharjah Biennial by Kathy Battista Hangama Amiri is an Afghan Canadian artist who lives and works in New Haven, Connecticut. A graduate of the prestigious MFA programme in painting at Yale School of Art, her journey to the hallowed Ivy League was not a typical blue-blood legacy line. Her family fled their native country, Afghanistan, …
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Kate Newby in Contemporary Art Daily

To view the full post visit Contemporary Art Daily. For more information about Kate Newby please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000

Jenine Marsh in Contemporary Art Daily

To view the full post visit Contemporary Art Daily. For more information about Jenine Marsh please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000

Sami Tsang in Art Viewer

Sami Tsang at COOPER COLE To view the full post visit Art Viewer. For more information about Sami Tsang please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000

Jenine Marsh in Art Viewer

Jenine Marsh at COOPER COLE To view the full post visit Art Viewer. For more information about Jenine Marsh please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000

Maureen Gruben in Inuit Art

5 Perspectives on Maureen Gruben’s Connection to Place by IAQ Kenojuak Ashevak Memorial Award shortlister Maureen Gruben is no stranger to accolades. Since 2017, Gruben’s visibility as a leading Canadian artist has only continued to grow exponentially with major exhibitions, acquisitions and prizes filling her CV. But this now-global public recognition only tells part of her story. […] To view the full article visit Inuit Art. For more information about Maureen Gruben …
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Hangama Amiri in Cultured

The Freshman Class of Art Basel: Meet 7 Dealers Making Their Debut at the 2023 Swiss Fair by Julie Baumgardner Cooper Cole Location: Toronto, Canada Founded: 2011 Founder: Simon Cole Vibe: Canadian and cool In Basel: Cooper Cole is on a roll. The Toronto outfit is showing the Afghan-Canadian artist Hangama Amiri, fresh off a show-stopper exhibition at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, in the fair’s Statements section. The artist, who utilizes textiles to “reflect on ideas of …
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G.B. Jones in Cornelia Magazine

G.B. Jones at Cooper Cole – Issue 12 By Dallas Fellini As we enter the gallery, we’re greeted by the artist’s name, spelled out sloppily across the stark white wall in a two-tone, drop-shadow tag: G-B-J-O- N-E-S. “Are you familiar with the artist?” a member of the gallery staff asks. Like any good queers who grew up on the internet, my friends and I spent years online acquainting ourselves with …
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Brie Ruais Featured on Artsy

8 Women Artists Using Ceramics to Subvert Art Traditions By Lydia Wilford Brie Ruais’s work expands the notion of corporeally oriented ceramics. ‘‘The sculptures tap into the body’s knowledge as opposed to the mind. I let the body and clay lead,” Ruais said in the press release for “Some Things I Know About Being In A Body”, her 2021 solo show at Albertz Benda. This tenet is expressed best in Intertwining Bodies, Roots, …
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Jagdeep Raina Featured on Artsy

10 Must-See Shows at Paris Gallery Weekend 2023 By Wilson Tarbox Jagdeep Raina, ‘Towards the valley’ Galerie Anne Barrault, Paris Apr. 20 – June 3 In his debut solo exhibition in France, Canadian artist Jagdeep Raina showcases his fascination with diverse textile techniques including Punjabi embroidery, or phulkari. Through his remarkable skill of painting images with colored threads, Raina aims to preserve endangered ancestral crafts, challenge gender stereotypes in textile art, and confront …
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Hangama Amiri in CBC Arts

This new exhibition wants you to know legendary poet Rumi ‘as a once-living person’ By Chris Dart Rumi, who was born Jalāl al-Dīn Muḥammad Balkhī, is best known as a poet, writer and religious scholar. What’s less well known is that, in modern terms, he grew up as a refugee. Rumi was born in 1207 on what is now the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan. When he was still a …
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Jagdeep Raina in Art Basel

Editors’ picks: Five exhibitions to see in May By Art Basel’s Editorial team Every six weeks, members of Art Basel’s Editorial team pick their favorite exhibitions across the globe. Here are five shows not to miss in May. Jagdeep Raina ‘Towards the valley’ Galerie Anne Barrault, Paris Until June 3, 2023 In this subtle show, Canadian artist Jagdeep Raina presents recent embroideries, quilts, and works on paper. Born in Canada, …
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Hangama Amiri in Art Basel

Artists of the Asian diaspora turn hybridity into resilience at Art Basel By Cleo Roberts-Komireddi Among the 18 artists showing in Statements at Art Basel in Basel this year are Baseera Khan, Hardeep Pandhal, and Hangama Amiri. Each artist harnesses their diasporic identity to explore experiences of hybridity and disaffection. […] Textiles are likewise loaded with notions of belonging and displacement for Hangama Amiri. Sewing was a constant activity in …
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Scott Treleaven in Artforum

Critics’ Picks Scott Treleaven at Cooper Cole By Brandon Kaufman Between 1996 and 1999, Scott Treleaven produced the influential zine This Is the Salivation Army, which often featured violent, black-and-white collages of male bodies piled on top of one another. The artist would treat each twink’s nubile torso with Eucharistic solemnity; like William S. Burroughs and David Wojnarowicz before him, he found in homosexuality both the exquisitely seraphic and the utterly …
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Hangama Amiri in The American Scholar

Hangama Amiri Afghan Women’s Lives, Past and Present By Noelani Kirschner Hangama Amiri migrated with her family from their native Afghanistan to Canada after the Taliban seized power in the mid-1990s. Two years ago, as the Taliban was gaining ground once again, Amiri was asked to create works for a solo exhibition at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut. She dedicated it to the past, present, and future of …
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Paul P. in The Globe and Mail

Paul P. exhibit at National Gallery of Canada fuses contemporary work with historical precedents By Kate Taylor The Toronto artist known as Paul P. was born in 1977, which means he came of age after the height of the AIDS crisis. That’s relevant to his art because it looks backward to pre-AIDS erotica, pulled from the pages of 1960s gay-porn magazines or inspired by the more coded images of the …
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Hangama Amiri in The Yale Review

Home Isn’t One Place A textile tribute to the Afghan diaspora By Eugenia Bell The Afghan-born artist Hangama Amiri’s vivid, painterly tapestries explore notions of gender, community, and the essence of home. In her work, the most quotidian places and objects—a nail salon, a vanity, a kitchen table—become sites of cultural remembrance and fellowship among women. Amiri, whose family fled Taliban-ruled Kabul in 1996 and who now lives in the United …
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Jagdeep Raina in Frieze

Five Emerging Artists Exploring Heritage and Environment at Frieze New York 2023 By Frieze Staff Featuring galleries aged 12 years or younger from across the world, the Focus section at Frieze New York brings together some of today’s most exciting emerging artists. This year’s highlights include artists that interrogate cultural heritage and environmental change. Working in textile, drawing, ceramics, and video animation, Jagdeep Raina examines narratives of the Sikh and …
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Geoff McFetridge in The Hollywood Reporter

‘Geoff McFetridge: Drawing a Life’ Review: A Portrait of an Artist Attempting to Stay Faithful to His Vision By Justin Lowe There’s more than writer-director Spike Jonze tying together films like Adaptation, Her and Where the Wild Things Are: They all share titles designed by Geoff McFetridge, a prolific visual artist who often works behind the scenes on a wide variety of media and advertising projects. From Nike and Vans footwear to Pepsi billboards and …
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Geoff McFetridge in Deadline

SXSW First Look: ‘Geoff McFetridge: Drawing A Life’ Examines Artist Whose Work Surrounds Us, From Apple Watches To Nike Ads By Matthew Carey In an interview with the New York Review of Books last year, artist Geoff McFetridge noted that he grew up in the 1970s and ‘80s, a time “when culture became really good at speaking with images.” He became remarkably dexterous himself at communicating through images in design and artwork that …
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Georgia Dickie in The Provincetown Independent

Creating a System for the Nonsensical: Two FAWC Fellows Forge a Partnership Born of Frustration With the Status Quo By Amelia Roth-Dishy Georgia Dickie, who is from Toronto, and Tinja Ruusuvuori, who lives and works in Tampere, Finland, had never met before arriving in Provincetown for their Fine Arts Work Center fellowships last year. But their bond was immediate. “We were both experiencing something along the lines of soft burnout,” …
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Paul P in Galleries West

Paul P: Dreamy Time Travel Through Gay History By Paul Gessell Look closely at almost any young man’s photograph in an erotic gay magazine. Now, cut away his body, especially the private parts, and remove the background. Snip away until only the man’s head remains. Chances are you suddenly see that this young man, stripped of all context, resembles the polite boy next door rather than some lascivious seducer. He …
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Geoff McFetridge in Hypebeast

Geoff McFetridge Presents ‘Return to Stoner Forest’ at One trick Pony: His First Solo Show in LA in Years By Shawn Ghassemitari It’s been many years since Geoff McFetridge has showcased a solo show in Los Angeles, where he’s lived since moving from his hometown of Calgary, Canada. His latest solo exhibition, Return to Stoner Forest, is a way in which the artist looks to reconnect to the early stages of his career, …
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Vikky Alexander in Galleries West

The Mall: Kitsch and Class Collide in Exhibition About West Edmonton Mall By Megan Klak Turn a corner in West Edmonton Mall and you might stumble across a replica of the Augustus of Prima Porta, the Vatican Museum’s statue of Roman emperor Augustus Caesar. Arm raised, hip cocked, the statue is completely out of place, yet also right at home. Artists have had an uneasy relationship with the mall since …
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Hangama Amiri In Art in America

Hangama Amiri’s Kaleidoscopic Textile Art Summons the Strength of Women in Afghanistan By Jordan Amirkhani You can almost hear the cars and merchants, and smell the spices and food in Hangama Amiri’s large-scale tapestry Bazaar (2020). Rendered in a kaleidoscopic palette of jewel-tone fabrics—thick muslins, sturdy cottons, delicate chiffons, rich velvets, and shimmering satins—Amiri’s bazaar is a dense arrangement of vendor stalls, shop doors, and goods on offer in her neighborhood market in …
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Hangama Amiri in The New York Times

An Artist Puts Kabul in a New Light (With Lipstick and Manicure) By Ted Loos At a time when the Taliban are rolling back women’s rights in Afghanistan, the Afghan-Canadian artist Hangama Amiri has created a form of long-distance resistance through her painstakingly sewn textile artworks, now on display at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Conn. The images in her colorful fabric wall hangings are drawn from the …
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Eve Tagny in The Daily

‘Thick as Mud’ at the Henry Art Gallery shows that mud is more than just a material By Taylor Bruce Mud is more than a material; it is also a subject — the subject of memory, of lives lived and lives lost, of places and their stories. It is both earth and water, and an in-between state that can be used as a metaphor for resolving boundaries and binaries, according …
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Hangama Amiri in Cultured Magazine

Hangama Amiri Will Not Let Freedom for Afghanistan Women Be Forgotten By Annabel Keenan For Hangama Amiri’s first ever museum solo show,  A Homage to Home, at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, she explores the evolving definition of home. Reflecting on her own journey fleeing Afghanistan as a child, the artist reframes home as a concept in flux and one that is about the person more than the place. …
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Eve Tagny in CBC Arts

Funeral Garden turns a Quebec gallery into a space for mourning victims of police violence By Didier Morelli Stepping out of a winter storm and into Eve Tagny‘s Funeral Garden, a solo exhibition at Montreal’s Plein sud, the chaos of heavy snowfall is swapped for stillness. Snowbanks are replaced by dried flora, plant beds made of soil, and gallery walls covered in rolls of unfurled kraft paper. The space is serene. For …
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Kate Newby in Ocula

10 Must-See Institutional Shows in 2023 Kate Newby’s fantastical wind chime sculpture SHE’S TALKING TO THE WALL (2012–21) has arrived at Wellington’s Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. Cemented in the Auckland-born artist’s interest in the handmade, Newby’s work urges visitors to absorb their surroundings by illuminating otherwise empty spaces. Newby’s glass and clay installation engages the senses of sound and sight, inviting us to delight in a mesmeric experience. Glistening …
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Hangama Amiri in Stir World

‘Pop South Asia: Artistic Explorations in the Popular’ at SAF navigates multiple themes By Urvi Kothari In this Instagram-able day and age, I often wonder about the relation between art and its popularity within a millennial world. The answer lies within the realms of a common terminology, ‘Pop Art’- a phenomenon that emerged in the mid 1950s and early 1960s. For instance, one’s thought confines within the canonical names, often related …
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Hangama Amiri in Alarabya News

‘Pop South Asia’ group show at Sharjah Art Foundation breaks new critical ground By Krishna Kumar One of the first major group exhibitions providing a substantial survey of modern and contemporary South Asian art that engages with popular culture is about to conclude this week at the Sharjah Art Foundation (SAF), having already drawn a wide range of connoisseurs as well as the art-loving public. The exhibition ‘Pop South Asia: …
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Sara Cwynar Collaborates with Christian Dior

  Witness the Dior Lady Art creations of Sara Cwynar come to life in this video tracing the inspirations behind the bags, namely the visual politics of popular images. The New York-based Canadian artist for this seventh edition of the project revisits the Lady Dior as an encyclopedic object covered in patches of images sourced from museum archives and art history books, interspersed with stock photos depicting everything from birds …
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Fin Simonetti Interviewed in Frontrunner

Fin Simonetti’s Magical Thinking By Maya Ibbitson In quests for security and self-soothing, ecclestiastical thinking is often sought out as a portal for respite. In her most recent solo show, Our Denomination, Fin Simonetti’s work serves as a kind of contemporary examination of the sacred and the collective, and how these ideas can be tethered to basic human needs in the face of vulnerability. The show was displayed on bleachers, …
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Brie Ruais in The Quietus

There Will Be Mud: Contemporary Ceramics At The Hayward By Jennifer Lucy Allan …While the moments where functional ceramic objects are referenced … bring Strange Clay into sharp focus, it plays best upon the imagination when this most everyday material becomes literally unearthly. It’s in this duality of potential as the real and the unreal; the earth bound and limitless, that clay will always provide transcendent possibilities for art. […] …
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Kate Newby Wins Ettore e Ines Fico Prize

Kate Newby wins Ettore e Ines Fico Prize, awarded by an international jury at Artissima Kate Newby is the winner of the thirteenth edition of the Ettore e Ines Fico Prize promoted by MEF Museo Ettore Fico of Turin and aimed at supporting and enhancing the work of young artists through an acquisition. Among the artists presented at the fair, the winner has been chosen thanks to her international research and poetics. For …
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Fin Simonetti in Formeuniche

Second-best scenario. What future will come? The post-human transformations of Ivana Basic, Benni Bosetto, Ambra Castagnetti and Fin Simonetti By Elena Usually What futuristic scenario awaits postmodern man? Considering the current geopolitical context (in which the precipice of the contemporary apocalypse subverts the presumed human certainties, of which decaying societies are full), between the desire to produce ever more intelligent objects and ever more technological subjects, by who will be …
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Brie Ruais in The Guardian

Strange Clay review – gleeful globs, erupting goo and an octopus in the toilet By Adrian Searle Hayward Gallery, London. This contemporary ceramics show has everything from beautiful pitchers and sexy pots to stupid knick-knacks. Great globby gouts of shiny cerulean blue glaze slump and slide in an arrested, fused avalanche on a bare red column that’s taller than me. Something like a turd nestles on top of a misshapen, …
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Georgia Dickie Attends FAWC Visual Arts Fellowship

Welcoming the 2022-23 FAWC Visual Arts Fellows By Dorothea Samaha The Fine Arts Work Center welcomed 10 visual arts fellows this month for seven-month-long residencies in Provincetown. Executive Director Sharon Polli says the fellowship program is central to the Work Center’s purpose. “We were founded more than 50 years ago with a mission to provide emerging artists and writers with time and space to develop new directions in their creative …
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Maureen Gruben in Galleries West

Arctic Highways by Genesee Keevil In late September, Russia began drafting Sámi reindeer herders in Siberia to fight in its ongoing war with Ukraine, says Sámi artist Tomas Colbengtson. “Even though they are geographically far, I feel so close to them,” says Colbengtson, who is lobbying the Sámi Parliament in Sweden to offer sanctuary to these Siberian counterparts. “We have also been used in such a way, having our land, water …
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Kate Newby in The New York Times

Art That Rose Through the Cracks: Three exemplary exhibitions draw attention to public space, from community gardens to rooftop sculptures By John Vincler The exhibition traces a history of art taking place in the neglected corners of the city, where nature sometimes seems to have been built over and largely pushed out. Two other exemplary current shows — Miles Huston’s “Cinderella Had a Farm,” at Gordon Robichaux, and Kate Newby’s “We …
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Jennie Jieun Lee in The New York Times

Unconventional Urns That Go Beyond Solemnity Clockwise from top left: cinerary urns in ceramic and marble by the artists Jennie Jieun Lee; John Booth; Bari Ziperstein; and Diego Perrone and Andrea Sala. […] In Santa Monica, Calif., Farrington Mortuary recently hired Jennie Jieun Lee, a 49-year-old sculptor from New York, to create a series of experimental funerary vessels. Free-form and vivid, with richly colored glazes, her pottery is informed by …
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Hangama Amiri in Frieze

In ‘Pop South Asia’ Kitsch Reigns Supreme By Rahel Aima Featuring more than 100 works inspired by popular culture, ‘Pop South Asia’ contains all the visual touchstones that you might anticipate: Bollywood, cricket and Islamic sloganeering; streetside chai stalls and Hindu deities strong-armed into product-sponsorship deals that collapse the distance between devotion and commerce. Florid lorry art makes its expected appearance too, in a series of painted wooden – and, in one …
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Rachel Eulena Williams in Art in America

Double Take: “52 Artists: A Feminist Milestone” at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum By Wendy Vogel This summer has proven a somber time for reflection on five decades of the feminist movement, given the United States Supreme Court’s decision to reverse the constitutional protection of abortion rights this past June. That same month, the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Connecticut offered a more empowering commemoration of the heyday of women’s liberation: “52 Artists: …
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Hangama Amiri Interviewed in Guernica Magazine

Back Draft: Hangama Amiri By Hua Xi Hangama Amiri is an Afghan Canadian artist whose fabric installations reflect and refract. Her life-sized tapestries, collected in “Bazaar, A Recollection of Home,” recreate apartment blocks and shopping districts in her home country of Afghanistan, reinvented and distorted through the lens of memory. Using a wide range of textiles in many textures, Amiri creates kaleidoscopic collages of vibrant and varied patterns, arranged in …
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Sara Cwynar in W Magazine

A Visual Appreciation of Fine Artists Appropriating Commercial Photography By Stephanie Eckardt The Los Angeles County Museum of Art didn’t have to look too deep into its collection to find source material for “Objects of Desire: Photography and the Language of Advertising.” The degree to which artists have appropriated advertising techniques to further agendas of their own—since the 1970s in particular—is so prominent that the bulk of the works on …
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Sara Cwynar Reviewed in Contemporary Art Review

Sara Cwynar and the Texture of Digital Pictures By: Erin F. O’Leary I read critic Lucy Sante’s stunning essay for Vanity Fair, “On Becoming Lucy Sante,” from bed one morning this January, my phone’s brightness turned down as my eyes acclimated to the light. In it, Sante, who came out as transgender in 2021 at age 67, recalls her discovery of FaceApp’s gender-swapping filter, through which she subsequently fed “every …
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Sara Cwynar in The Eye of Photography

8th Triennial of Photography Hamburg 2022: Currency Engaging the theme of Currency from various perspectives, the 8th Triennial of Photography Hamburg opens on May 20, 2022 with twelve exhibitions presenting over 75 artists. From appraised colonial-era photo albums to poetic reveries, social documentary and conceptual approaches to photography, the exhibitions explore the myriad ways in which photographs are produced, circulated, and interpreted. At the Hall for Contemporary Art – Deichtorhallen Hamburg, Currency: Photography Beyond Capture explores conceptual approaches to …
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Jorian Charlton Featured on Artsy

5 Artists on Our Radar in August 2022 By Olivia Horn […] Employing the stylization and precise staging of editorial photography, Jorian Charlton captures moments of confident self-presentation. Her subjects, predominantly Black women, gaze directly into her lens. In one 2021 portrait, Toronto-based DJ and producer Bambii crouches on a clear surface, her environs illuminated in swaths of red, pink, and green. The dramatic angle and lighting create a riveting …
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Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill in Galleries West

Venice Biennale: Can magical thinking help us imagine new ways through troubled times? By Yani Kong In The Milk of Dreams, a beautifully illustrated book made by the late British-Mexican artist Leonora Carrington for her sons, the day-to-day world constantly transforms through the prism of magical thinking. This year’s Venice Biennale, which takes Carrington’s book as its theme, taps into the artist’s surrealist approach to access unconscious experiences. The biennale’s main …
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Jennie Jieun Lee Featured by Alexander McQueen

Process: Jennie Jieun Lee Jennie Jieun Lee is an artist based in New York state, USA. She is known for richly textured ceramics ‌covered in abstract paintings and an array of objects including wheel-thrown, hand-altered vessels, ‌masks and slip cast busts with morphing and multipart features that mimic, articulate and navigate ‌emotional and psychological spaces‌ “In developing my ceramic sculpture piece for the 2022 Alexander McQueen special project based on …
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Eve Tagny in Hyperallergic

Images Festival: Slow Edition Considers Tenderness as Transgression in a soft landing Images Festival presents a soft landing, an exhibition at Gallery TPW in Toronto, Canada, that considers the reparative and restorative potential of slowness through work by artists Alyssa Alikpala, Erika DeFreitas, Rihab Essayh, Eve Tagny, and Alize Zorlutuna. While not quite sopping in grief, the show proposes a place where sorrow, heartache, and distress may be embraced and processed. With …
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G.B. Jones Interviewed in A Grrrl’s Two Sound Cents

A Conversation with G.B. Jones: The Foremother of Queercore & Riot Grrrl By Isabel Corp The Queercore movement did not originate in San Francisco, or in Oregon, but in a small apartment at Queen and Parliament in Toronto. In 1985, G.B. Jones and Bruce LaBruce created a queer punk zine called J.D.s, which stood for Juvenile Delinquents, James Dean, and J.D. Salinger. Fusing B-movie aesthetics with bootlicking fetishes and cheeky polemics, J.D.s was known …
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Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill Featured in Art&Education

Field Notes: Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill in “The Milk of Dreams,” 59th Venice Biennale By Leo Cocar Ducking into the Central Pavilion at the 59th Venice Biennale, the scent of the city’s slightly fetid saltwater and the Giardini’s sunbaked paving stone gives way to a heady mix of sweat and duty-free fragrances. Passing through the high-vaulted entrance of “The Milk of Dreams” and into the side galleries, a new smell lingers …
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New Document Featured on AGO Insider

A new group show at Toronto’s Cooper Cole Gallery features AGO Artist-in-Residence alum, Timothy Yanick Hunter For the last month, a new group exhibition at Toronto’s Cooper Cole Gallery has explored and questioned the subjectivity of historical narratives. New Document features an interdisciplinary collection of works from contemporary artists Moyra Davey, Nikita Gale, Laurie Kang, Paul Mpagi Sepuya and – an AGO Artist-in-Residence alumnus – Timothy Yanick Hunter. New Document brings together conceptual photographic, …
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Geoff McFetridge Interviewed in Field Mag

Geoff McFetridge Talks Norse Projects Collab, Style, Family & Outdoors By Tanner Bowden t’s not easy to fill in the blank in the sentence “Geoff McFetridge is ______.” Geoff McFetridge is an artist, yes, but within that, he’s a painter, drawer, sculpter, and animator, among other things. He also likes to ski, flyfish, and bikepack. So maybe the correct answer is simply, “hard to peg.” Not hard, however, for Norse Projects, which recently …
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Jorian Charlton Reviewed in Maisonneuve

Out of Many: Sharine Taylor reviews photographer Jorian Charlton’s first solo exhibition By Sharine Taylor For many Black people, the archive can be a hostile site. As Black feminist thinker Saidiya Hartman writes in her essay “Venus in Two Acts,” archives are limited in their ability to document Black life. Despite there being almost no firsthand account of Black women’s journeys through the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the untenable violence inflicted on …
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Jennie Jieun Lee in Artnet News

Alexander McQueen Creative Director Sarah Burton Asked 12 Female Artists to Interpret Her Pre-Fall Collection, With Intriguing Results By William Van Meter Alexander McQueen is known for sending art down the runway, and elevating the runway show to performance art. Many grand instances immediately come to mind: model Shalom Harlow savagely graffitied by robot arms for spring 1999, or spring 2001’s fashion mic drop, the “Voss” collection. For the finale, …
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Jennie Jieun Lee Commissioned by Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen celebrates the creative process with a unique art installation: Sarah Burton invites 12 artists to create work inspired by her latest collection By Sarah Karmali Alexander McQueen, and creative director Sarah Burton, have long been known for celebrating craftsmanship and creativity; the design and technical processes have always been as important to document as the final piece itself. And this month, the label’s flagship London store on Old …
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Sara Cwynar Reviewed in Public Parking

Is the image a bribe? By Emily Doucet “Have you seen these images before?” asked the artist. Viewing a livestream from my couch at home, I watched Sara Cwynar move about the room in an all-red outfit, staging a series of scenes: Seen from above, the artist sits in a metal folding chair atop a red-gridded piece of paper and holds up different cut out images above her head for …
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Sara Cwynar in Capture Photography Festival

Sara Cwynar: Umi Curated by Emmy Lee Wall, Apr 1 – Mar 18, 2023 Colliding imagery from diverse sources including thrift stores, eBay, photo albums, art historical texts, and advertising, Sara Cwynar recontextualizes the visual material that surrounds us and through this process reveals our collective visual assumptions and biases. For her site-specific installation on the façade of the Dal Grauer Substation, Cwynar created a monumental image, Umi, featuring a woman participating in …
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Jorian Charlton in Artoronto.CA

Jorian Charlton, Kadine Lindsay: fi di gyal dem at CONTACT By Bronwen Cox “I remember being punished as a child for staring, for those hard intense direct looks children would give grown-ups, looks that were seen as confrontational, as gestures of resistance, challenges to authority… there is power in looking.” – bell hooks, Black Looks: Race and Representation On the site page for Jorian Charlton’s and Kadine Lindsay’s collaborative exhibition, fi …
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Jorian Charlton in Artforum

Critic’s Picks: Jorian Charlton Out of Many By Esmé Hogeveen Moving through “Jorian Charlton: Out of Many,” an exhibition of work by the Toronto-based photographer, one is struck by the dynamism of her subjects. Several of the large-scale portraits feature individuals—mostly adults and a handful of children—looking out assertively at the viewer. In some cases, we’re invited to witness domestic intimacies: In Untitled (Shai & Lex), 2020, a young man embraces …
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Timothy Yanick Hunter in Public Parking

In our very own hands By Luther Konadu […] II. My curiosity around the 1902 eruption of Mt. Pelée, my subsequent commitment to inquire further in detail, then re-narrate it and by extension, re-emphasize its significance and innocent lives lost, was prompted by an art exhibition. Toronto-based artist Timothy Yanick Hunter’s recently presented, Volcanic Spin at Cooper Cole Gallery. Showing from November 27, 2021 to January 8, 2022, the exhibition departs from …
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Sara Cwynar in Art Viewer

Sara Cwynar: Apple To view the full post visit Art Viewer  For more information about Sara Cwynar please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000

Oreka James Reviewed in Public Parking

Creation Story By Omi Rodney I Oreka James’ Untitled 1 sculpture features fabric stretched over plywood fastened to a brushed aluminum anchor. The sculpture bursts out of star-shaped soil to come to a star-shaped point. The structure spins continuously, flashing between two abstract paintings that evoke the beginning of life. As the pulsing sound of the motor mimics the relentless tide of the ocean and fills the room, I am moved to …
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Timothy Yanick Hunter in The New Inquiry

Pacing Ourselves: Timothy Yanick Hunter and Katherine McKittrick in Conversation By Katherine McKittrick In December 2021, Cooper Cole exhibited Timothy Yanick Hunter’s solo exhibition, Volcanic  Spine. The exhibit, set in a stark white room, has four pieces: “Untitled (Loop 1),” “Untitled  (Loop 2),” “No More Accidents,” and “Pelée’s Tower.” Each composition is an expression of different archival moments from black history: traffic accident rates, repeated photographs of a volcanic eruption, home movies, the …
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Rachel Eulena Williams in Brooklyn Rail

How to Get Free of the Rectangle By Louis Block Absent any punctuation, How to Get Free of the Rectangle reads as a directive. Decades ago, it might have been a longing question, but now painting’s rectangle has been bent, torn, re-sewn, and looped in on itself, so it might be easy to scoff at the premise and how far removed it is from the radical. But this modest survey accomplishes a …
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Timothy Yanick Hunter in Function Magazine

Technologies of the diasporic mind: an Interview with Timothy Yanick Hunter An interview by Heather Rigg Timothy Yanick Hunter’s practice is rooted in a research based process of sampling and remixing. He draws from AI algorithms, familial knowledge, DJs, mix-tapes, videos, and institutional archives to create his own multidisciplinary repertoire of Black diasporic culture. His videos and music recontextualize his sources, often pulling them out of colonial modes of seeing …
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Sara Cwynar in Ninu Nina

ARTIST SARA CWYNAR By: Leila Antakly In May 2022 artist Sara Cwynar will be the next artist in residence at HORIZON, a new foundation in Los Angeles. Her residency follows HORIZON’s inaugural artist-in-residence Laurie Kang and also comes after Cwynar’s solo exhibition at ICA LA. About Sara Cwynar  Born 1985, Vancouver, BC, Canada. The artist lives and works in Brooklyn, New York, USA.  Sara Cwynar has exhibited at MoMA, MoMA PS1 and Foxy …
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Hangama Amiri Included in 2023 Sharjah Biennial – Art Review

Artists for 2023 Sharjah Biennial revealed The artists who will show at the fifteenth Sharjah Biennial have been announced. The exhibition Thinking Historically in the Present was conceived by Okwui Enwezor before the curator’s death in 2019 and has been implemented by the Sharjah Foundation’s director Hoor Al Qasimi. The work of the 140 artists will be shown in venues across the emirate including a vegetable market, a power station and a …
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Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill in The Guardian

Cyborgs, sirens and a singing murderer: the thrilling, oligarch-free Venice Biennale – review By Adrian Searle Wonders and marvels, the beautiful and the terrible, the celebratory and the morbid all fill the 59th Venice Biennale. Business as usual, you might say, but there are no trillionaire oligarch yachts moored by the Giardini and there is less razzmatazz all round. As well as being the first biennale since the pandemic, this is …
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Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill in Artnet News

In Pictures: Take a Tour of the Venice Biennale’s Giardini Section, Which Is Full of Inventive Abstraction and the Art of Magic By Ben Davis To view the full photo essay visit Artnet News For more information about Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000  

Kate Newby in Wallpaper

Reclaim the Earth, urge artists at Paris’ Palais de Tokyo By Amy Serafin Reclaim the Earth’ is both the title and the rallying cry of a new group exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. It looks beyond the Western model to other ways of existing in the world, where humans are an integral part of the environment rather than a dominating, and often destructive, force. ‘I am convinced …
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Gabrielle L’Hirondelle Hill in Frieze

The Collective Feminist Agency of ‘The Milk of Dreams’ In a cavernous Central Pavilion, ‘The Milk of Dreams’ reminds us that feminist triumphs and struggles stretch beyond time and geography By Vanessa Peterson Curated by Cecilia Alemani, director of New York’s High Line Art, ‘The Milk of Dreams’ has garnered significant attention – not least for being the first edition of the Venice Biennale to take place for three years, …
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Daniel Rios Rodriguez in Glasstire

Glasstire counts down the top five art events in Texas. 1. Texan: Part 1 VSF Texas (Dallas) April 22 – May 15, 2022 From Various Small Fires: “Various Small Fires is proud to present its inaugural exhibition at VSF Texas, the gallery’s newest location situated in Downtown Dallas. Presented in two parts, Texan celebrates the rich contributions Texas-born artists have made to the landscape of contemporary art and offers a homecoming for …
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Sara Cwynar in CBC News

Look up! At Vancouver’s Capture Photography Festival, images are where you least expect them By Leah Collins The average SkyTrain commuter might not realize it, but for the month of April, a trip on the Canada Line doubles as entry to Vancouver’s Capture Photography Festival. Opening Friday, and running through April 29, the festival celebrates the best in contemporary “lens-based” art, and it’s the largest event of its kind in western …
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Sara Cwynar in The Georgia Straight

Capture Photography Festival will present subtly subversive public art by Sara Cwynar By Charlie Smith Vancouver-born and Brooklyn-based contemporary artist Sara Cwynar has already hit the big time well in advance of her 40th birthday. The Yale graduate’s art is already in the permanent collections of the Guggenheim and the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and several other high-profile institutions. And soon, one …
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Jagdeep Raina Reviewed in Artforum

Jagdeep Raina at the Textile Museum of Canada By Charlene K. Lau Softness is power, especially in a world that puts so much faith in unyielding hardness. The works in Jagdeep Raina’s exhibition “Chase” embrace tenderness and the pursuit of dreams through immigrant life. His art—via embroidered tapestries, quilts, drawings, and videos—captures moments from the lives of Kashmiri and Punjabi Sikh communities around the globe. Each piece seeks to highlight …
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Daniel Rios Rodriguez Interviewed in Glasstire

An Interview with Daniel Rios Rodriguez By Colette Copeland I met with Daniel Rios Rodriguez in early January at his studio in south San Antonio. We discussed his connection and commitment to the land, his family, and painting. His work is well known internationally and nationally, but has not received as much attention in his home state of Texas. Over the last three years, he has had solo exhibitions in Dublin, Los …
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Sara Cwynar Reviewed in Variable West

The Importance of Meaningless Things: Sara Cwynar at ICA LA By Sarah Fensom “Oh, this was Barney’s!” a group of Issey Miyake-clad septuagenarian women squealed in recognition. They were sitting on a red, elbow macaroni-shaped bench, watching Glass Life (2021), Sara Cwynar’s six-channel video installation in the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Glass Life features footage of the upscale New York department store in its highly publicized last days. The footage is a …
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“8 Americans” Featuring Jennie Jieun Lee Reviewed in Artforum

8 Americans – Chart By Dawn Chan If you found yourself thinking that the artists included in “8 Americans”—Hyegyeong Choi, Tishan Hsu, Byron Kim, Antonia Kuo, Timothy Lai, Jennie Jieun Lee, Kang Seung Lee, and Jean Shin—had anything in common . . . well, that was on you. And therein lies the question and provocation of this exhibition: What does it mean to mount a show featuring Asian American artists …
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Georgia Dickie in Celine Art Projects

Georgia Dickie at Celine Paris Duphot “SMILE”, 2013 RUBBER, WOOD, ALUMINIUM 10 To view more information visit the Celine Website For more information about Georgia Dickie please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000

Sami Tsang in The Globe and Mail

Pandemic life has taken away the much-needed element of surprise By Odessa Paloma Parker […] The last time I felt a rush (without the risk, mind you) was in January on the opening day of Toronto art gallery Cooper Cole’s latest exhibition, Separate/Together. While winding my way through the collection of pieces, I was taken aback by a ceramic work by Sami Tsang. Titled Still We Rise, it’s a female figure …
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Separate/Together in Artoronto.ca

Separate/Together at Cooper Cole Gallery By Zhiyi Fang The title of the exhibition at Cooper Cole Gallery, Separate/Together, calls to mind the feeling of being separated but together, a feeling that all of us have experienced during the pandemic lockdown. What happens when separate materials are combined in a new way? Cooper Cole Gallery presents the group exhibition Separate/Together, featuring both Canadian and international aritsts: Gaëlle Choisne, Sharona Franklin, ektor garcia, Maureen Gruben, …
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Rachel Eulena Williams in Culture Type

On View: See Images from ‘Rachel Eulena Williams: Joy and Rain’ Exhibition Features New Sculptural Paintings at Xavier Hufkens Gallery in Brussels To view the full article visit Culture Type For more information about Rachel Eulena Williams please contact the gallery: info@coopercolegallery.com +1.416.531.8000  

Scott Treleven in The Guardian

Escape reality: images at the edge, from Kashmir to the cosmos – in pictures A current series of untitled collages. Scott Treleaven creates bipartite constructions from more than two decades’ worth of his own 35mm snapshots, pairing ancient marble statues with abstracted architecture and a milky blue sky with a vase of flowers rendered in black and white. To view the full article visit The Guardian For more information about …
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Brie Ruais Reviewed in Art & Object

Brie Ruais: Inside her Process & Partnership with Clay By Barbara A. MacAdam At 130 pounds, Brie Ruais is equal in weight and material substance to her collaborator: clay. Each work they embark on involves pulling out the partner’s guts and pushing them into a shape. Ruais is generous in ascribing authorship: “I let the body and clay lead,” she has said. Her most recent show, at albertz benda gallery …
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Vikky Alexander in Artnet News

Editors’ Picks: 9 Events for Your Art Calendar This Week 1. “Tuesday Night Talks: Vikky Alexander” at the Audain Art Museum, Whistler, Canada The Audain Art Museum kicks off season three of its virtual Tuesday Night Talks programming with Canada’s Vikky Alexander, whose piece Orange Ceiling (2010) was recently acquired by the institution. The photographer, sculptor, and installation artist will speak with director and chief curator Curtis Collins about her career—including her ties to the …
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Brie Ruais in The Brooklyn Rail

The Proof in the Print By Brie Ruais I used to know an artist who carried a small copper plate in her daily tote bag. It accumulated the scratches and marks made by other objects in her bag as they rubbed against each other with her body’s movement throughout the day. I think of my body as that plate, accumulating all kinds of physical and psychical scratches from floating around …
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Scott Treleaven in Art Basel Highlights

Seven artists redefining photography A pivotal figure of underground cinema and queer zines of the 1990s, Scott Treleaven (presented by Cooper Cole, Toronto) has a practice that spans collage, film, video, drawing, photography, and installation. Most recently, he has translated a text-based cut-up technique popularized by William S. Burroughs into photographic language with an ongoing series of untitled collages. He creates bipartite constructions from more than two decades’ worth of his own 35 …
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