News: Group Show at The Power Plant

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Georgia Dickie, Jeremy Jansen, and Tessar Lo will be exhibiting work in a group show curated by Micah Lexier at The Power Plant in Toronto.

Micah Lexier
One, and Two, and More Than Two
September 21, 2013 – January 4, 2014
The Power Plant

“At his most ambitious, however, is Lexier’s More Than Two (Let It Make Itself), a curatorial project that displays over 200 new and recently created artworks and objects by 101 artists/duos/collectives in and around Toronto. Encompassing artists at varying stages of their careers, Lexier presents his take on the wide-ranging, multi-generational portrait of a robust Toronto art community. In seeking to celebrate this expansive community, Lexier brings to The Power Plant an incisive look at the networks of creative production that surround it. “The thirty vitrines that constitute the exhibition”, he states, “house my personal take on some of the wonderful, inventive, like-minded objects that I encountered during my research.” More Than Two is in constant dialogue with Lexier’s whole exhibition, enabling audiences to see and experience the artist’s multi-faceted practice. One, and Two, and More Than Two is a vibrant portrait of not only an artist but of his practice as well as his diverse community.

Micah Lexier (born Winnipeg, Manitoba, 1960) is an artist and curator living and working in Toronto. Over the last thirty years, Lexier has participated in a large number of international and national solo exhibitions and group exhibitions, and has produced several local public commissions. His work is found in various collections, including: The British Museum, London; the Contemporary Art Gallery, Sydney, Australia; The National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; and The Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. He is represented by Birch Contemporary, Toronto.”

For more information please visit The Power Plant.

PRESS: TESSAR LO ON JUXTAPOZ

Juxtapoz Magazine recently featured Tessar Lo on their website.

“Toronto-based Tessar Lo has a unique expressionistic style reminiscent of Basquiat or Anthony Lister. His dreamy, motion-filled paintings represent fragments of some free-flowing consciousness. Lo’s works draw energy from the visual language of children’s drawings, mysticism, symbols and totems. We love being able to see the artist’s hand so vividly in the strokes and lines of these dynamic, deeply engaging works.”

To see the full post please visit Juxtapoz Magazine.

Press: Tessar Lo & Mark DeLong Reviewed By Canadian Art

Tessar Sebastian Lo and Mark DeLong’s current exhibitions at the gallery received a review from Canadian Art.

“Currently on view at Cooper Cole Gallery in Toronto is an exhibition that juxtaposes bodies of work by two Canadian artists of distinctly different practices—one more emotional and illustrative, the other more conceptual and abstract. Interestingly, both artists’ visual gestures still fit with gallery owner Simon Cole’s long-time interest in street-based art practices such as graffiti, stencil and paste-up.

The larger portion of Cooper Cole’s floor space (which is fairly large for a Dundas West location) is dedicated to “Past, Present, Past-Present,” an exhibition of new paintings by Toronto-based artist Tessar Sebastian Lo, while the smaller rear gallery hosts “No Cover,” a small collection of works by Vancouver-based artist Mark DeLong.

DeLong’s work is described on the gallery website as a blending of the abstract and the representational, though its representational qualities perhaps owe more to the quirky titles of the paintings than to what can be deciphered from the canvases themselves.

Bagels for Lunch, for example, is a recent work by the self-taught DeLong that forces me to look for these aforementioned bagels; though I do eventually allow myself to settle on a shape that could be a man eating a bagel, I wonder if DeLong is manipulating me, using the dichotomy of image and language as a tool of suggestion, the way a psychiatrist would ask someone what they see in an inkblot.

DeLong’s 2012 work Grapes boasts an equally absurd relationship with its title. While I feel certain that there are no grapes to be found in this image, I’m amused by the dry humour and confidently lazy brushstrokes that distinguish DeLong’s work; while most likely unintentional, I can’t help recalling the accusatory painting in Ad Reinhardt’s famous “What do you represent?” comic. The rich colours and suggested narratives induce a perplexing interrogation of the work, a mode that is certainly more in line with contemporary practices than the effects found in the adjoining exhibition.

I found Cole’s inclusion of Lo’s more expressive work to be somewhat cheeky given DeLong’s drier approach. Though Lo’s and DeLong’s works both speak to a mix of abstraction and representation, the similarities end there. There is no time for self-referentiality or apathy in Lo’s paintings; instead, they are urgent with understated angst.

Lo’s work, for me, cannot escape the distinct feel of outsider art—although the artist is an graduate of the illustration program at Sheridan College and has been exhibited nationally and internationally—and similarly, its ties to symbolist archetypes.

Still Life, Before, (no suggestive titles here) is a large painting that feels cumulative of all of Lo’s preferred symbols (or, as he refers to them, totems). The surface is an unusual blend of pastels and surly darknesses, depicting a bird’s-eye view of a tabletop with Cézanne-esque fruits, clocks, compasses, a knife, eggs, and what seems to be a disembodied pair of hands and a face.

This work by Lo—and all his others here, in fact—provide surreal documentation of the fleeting moments in time in which we make decisions that lead us down one path or another, whether we choose to dwell in the past, letting our relative melancholies consume us, or to become resilient en route to the present.

While my studies in art history presuppose that I should be more stimulated by the conceptual nature of DeLong’s work, I can’t help but feel drawn to Lo’s paintings, and to the emotional honesty which informs them.”

Written by Mariam Nader.

To view the full review please visit Canadian Art.

Tessar Sebastian Lo’s exhibition past, present, past-present, and Mark DeLong’s exhibition No Cover continues until April 22, 2012.

For sales and press inquires, please contact the gallery.

News: Tessar Lo Multiple Release

In conjunction with his upcoming exhibition at the gallery, COOPER COLE will be releasing a sculptural edition from Tessar Lo.

Titled “don’t say, dansé”, this multiple is constructed of gypsum with an acrylic and wax finish and comes in a screen printed box with a certificate of authenticity. This edition is limited to 25 with 5 artist proofs.

A select amount of this special edition are now available to purchase online.



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Tessar Lo / past, present, past-present, / March 30, 2012 – April 22, 2012

Opening reception / Friday March 30, 2012 / 6 – 10pm

For press and sales information please inquire with the gallery.

News: Tessar Lo Studio Visit

Gearing up to his forthcoming exhibition at COOPER COLE, Tessar Lo lets us in to his studio to have a preview of his new body of work. Tessar will be debuting a new series of paintings along with a sculptural edition.

For press and sales information please inquire with the gallery.

More images below.

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